Here is another installment in the “Rick Warren’s Twitter Theology” series. This one is a little more blasphemous and a little more blatant.
If you choose to read Psalm 22, the first verse will sound a bit familiar:

My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?

Recognize that? It’s what Jesus said on the Cross (Matt. 27:45-46). Jesus quoted that Psalm in order to draw attention to the fact that it was being fulfilled in Him on the Cross. Psalm 22 is a Messianic Psalm, in which David prophesied of the Christ (remember how all the scriptures really do point to Jesus). Here are a few verses, with my commentary thrown in:

All who see me mock me;    they make mouths at me; they wag their heads;“He trusts in the Lord; let him deliver him;    let him rescue him, for he delights in him!”

Verses 7 and 8 bear witness of the Elders and Scribes who mocked Christ at His beatings (Matt. 26:28), and of the crowd who said “…He trusts in God; let God deliver him now, if He desires him…” (Matt. 27:43).

I am poured out like water,    and all my bones are out of joint;my heart is like wax;    it is melted within my breast;

Vs. 14 revealed the suffering of the Messiah to come, pointing to the spear that would pierce Christ’s side, and how from the wound blood and water would pour out (John 19:34). 

For dogs encompass me;    a company of evildoers encircles me;they have pierced my hands and feet—I can count all my bones—they stare and gloat over me;they divide my garments among them,    and for my clothing they cast lots.

Here in verses 16-18 we see prophecy of (1) the Roman soldiers surrounding Christ at His death (‘dogs’ was a derogatory term for Gentiles); (2) the nature of the Crucifixion, which had not been invented at the time of the writing of the Psalms (Psalm 22 was written about 1000 years before Christ); and (3) the gambling that took place for Christ’s clothing (Matt. 27:35). This is an incredibly detailed description of the Passion of our Christ.
I hope you do some of your own research on Psalm 22. It’s a compelling Psalm, full of the riches of the Word of God. I also hope you see, even in this brief context, that this Psalm isn’t meant to condemn self-pity—in fact, Christ wasn’t speaking out of self-pity when He quoted this Psalm, nor does the Psalm prophesy of anything similar to self-pity. The Psalm prophesies of the victory that Christ would win for us on the Cross, and Christ quoted the Psalm in victory. Though He had become sin for us, and was experiencing the full wrath of God, it was “for the joy set before Him,” not for any sense of self-pity, that our Lord cried out.

Here is another installment in the “Rick Warren’s Twitter Theology” series. This one is a little more blasphemous and a little more blatant.

If you choose to read Psalm 22, the first verse will sound a bit familiar:

My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?

Recognize that? It’s what Jesus said on the Cross (Matt. 27:45-46). Jesus quoted that Psalm in order to draw attention to the fact that it was being fulfilled in Him on the Cross. Psalm 22 is a Messianic Psalm, in which David prophesied of the Christ (remember how all the scriptures really do point to Jesus). Here are a few verses, with my commentary thrown in:

All who see me mock me;
    they make mouths at me; they wag their heads;
“He trusts in the Lord; let him deliver him;
    let him rescue him, for he delights in him!”

Verses 7 and 8 bear witness of the Elders and Scribes who mocked Christ at His beatings (Matt. 26:28), and of the crowd who said “…He trusts in God; let God deliver him now, if He desires him…” (Matt. 27:43).

I am poured out like water,
    and all my bones are out of joint;
my heart is like wax;
    it is melted within my breast;

Vs. 14 revealed the suffering of the Messiah to come, pointing to the spear that would pierce Christ’s side, and how from the wound blood and water would pour out (John 19:34). 

For dogs encompass me;
    a company of evildoers encircles me;
they have pierced my hands and feet—
I can count all my bones—
they stare and gloat over me;
they divide my garments among them,
    and for my clothing they cast lots.

Here in verses 16-18 we see prophecy of (1) the Roman soldiers surrounding Christ at His death (‘dogs’ was a derogatory term for Gentiles); (2) the nature of the Crucifixion, which had not been invented at the time of the writing of the Psalms (Psalm 22 was written about 1000 years before Christ); and (3) the gambling that took place for Christ’s clothing (Matt. 27:35). This is an incredibly detailed description of the Passion of our Christ.

I hope you do some of your own research on Psalm 22. It’s a compelling Psalm, full of the riches of the Word of God. I also hope you see, even in this brief context, that this Psalm isn’t meant to condemn self-pity—in fact, Christ wasn’t speaking out of self-pity when He quoted this Psalm, nor does the Psalm prophesy of anything similar to self-pity. The Psalm prophesies of the victory that Christ would win for us on the Cross, and Christ quoted the Psalm in victory. Though He had become sin for us, and was experiencing the full wrath of God, it was “for the joy set before Him,” not for any sense of self-pity, that our Lord cried out.